Custom 60% Keyboard Build

Introduction

I’ve wanted a mechanical keyboard for a long time, but I could never find a key layout that I liked. After experimenting with making some macro buttons, I decided to make my own keyboard. This is what happened.

Design

The reason for designing this keyboard is because I wanted a tenkeyless keyboard with the arrow keys that was still around the 60-61% size.

With that in mind, I based my keyboard off of the keyboard on the Dell XPS 15 9550 and the newer Thinkpad T-series. The right shift key was completely removed in order to accommodate full-size arrow keys and keys on each side of the up-arrow were added, similar to Thinkpad keyboards. The space bar was extended to the standard 7u and, as such, the right alt and ctr keys were also removed.

layout

As with most 60% keyboards, the function keys are not there and, as such, they are accessed via “fn+top row”.

Because the right shift key is removed, it becomes difficult to do the key combination “shift+delete” with one hand. As such, the function key is utilized to enable the key combination to be done with one hand on the left side.

I designed the layout of the keyboard using Keyboard Layout Editor. This web application makes it easy to save and modify your designs. You can access my design here.

Designing and Ordering the Plate

My plate was manufactured by Lasergist. The easiest way to get this done is by inputting your raw data from Keyboard Layout Editor into Swillkb, which will generate a plate for you and automatically send the file to LaserGist.

I used decided to use 8 mount holes (4 on the top and bottom edges) sized for M2 screws. I also rounded the corners for aesthetic purposes.

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Swillkb will generate a DXF, SVG, or EPS file. You can send this file to any company to manufacture, although you may need to change the Kerf depending on the company’s specifications.

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I chose the thickness to be 1.5mm, in order for the switches to snap into the plate. All in all, my plate cost $50.29 including shipping.

Other Parts

For this build, I am using:

63  x Cherry MX Blue Switches
3     x 2u Costar MX Stabilizer
1     x 7u Costar MX Stabilizer

1     x USB Type B Port
1     x Teensy 2.0

1     x USB cable I happened to have
1     x PBT 87 Blank White Key Caps from Banggood (link, not referral)

I chose the Cherry MX Blue Switch (product code: MX1A-E1xx) as I plan on using the keyboard primarily for typing. I was attracted to the tactile bump and the audible click, as well as the higher actuation force. However, this makes it less suitable for public work environments. When I build another keyboard, I will probably choose to use MX Brown switches, to make it more public-area-friendly.

The Teensy 2.0 was chosen as there is plenty of firmware available for it. More detail on this below in the “programming section”.

As I will be making my own keycaps soon, I chose the cheapest set of blank keycaps I could find, which were a set of 87 blank keycaps from Banggood. They are very highly rated and are aggressively priced. One of the keycaps arrived broken. I sent Banggood a message, but never received a response.

The total cost for the electronic parts was $75.36 from Mouser. The USB cable was $10 and the keycaps were $17.69.

The Build

For the build, I referred to BrownFox’s guide on deskauthority (found here). I found that it is more efficient to bend the transistors first. It also makes sure they all look uniform.

For the cross wires, I used pre-cut and stripped wires for uniformity, with the exception of the spacebar switch, which required a length that was in between the sizes I had on hand.

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From this bottom view picture, you can see that I did not do a good job of connecting the rows and columns to my Teensy. Doing this again, I would have taken extra special care in planning this step out. As with most, I would position the Teensy under the space bar (potential drilling holes to mount it in place) and cut wires to ensure clutter-free, clean wiring.

Programming

To program the keyboard, I first explored using Hasu’s TMK firmware (free on github: here). The nice part about using TMK is that it comes with many pre-programmed layouts. Modifying a layout to fit your own custom design is also very easy. I used WinAVR to do the modifying. This requires writing in the rows and columns in your keyboard matrix and then mapping the keys functions to each key. For a very comprehensive guide on programming, check out matt3o’s guide: here.

However, I eventually came across EasyAVR which is… easy. The geekhack page (found: here) is detailed and explains everything that you need to do to create a layout. Modifying the source code is the most time consuming part. However, after that is done, the GUI makes it easy to map keys. I like how it is visual, so you can see how what your key map looks like.

Capture

I can share my firmware with anyone who wants it (email me for now until I upload it somewhere). I would highly suggest going through the process yourself. It is very satisfying and, even for an amateur like me, only took about an hour to do.

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To flash the firmware to the Teensy, I used Teensy Loader. Quick and painless.

Case

I wanted a case that I would be proud of showing off. As such, I decided to build a wooden case myself. I chose to use 1/2″ Cherry planks for the sides and 1/4″ Cherry for the bottom. The 1/2″ planks provide enough space to screw the plate into the sides securely.

I used traditional cabinet making techniques to put the wood together. Well, I tried. This is what I ended up with a pile of wood.

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That being said, I learned a lot about woodworking and made some mistakes that I definitely will not be making again.

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I figured that I had wasted enough money and I really wanted to get typing, so I used the M2 screws and brass standoffs that I had purchased as a makeshift case. While the screws sometimes become a little loose, it honestly works pretty well for something so “jank”. I feel very little flex and the keyboard sits at a comfortable angle for typing.

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However, I found this to be very unstable and, over time, the screws would unloosen and the entire keyboard would wobble. Furthermore, I experienced quite a bit of keyboard flex, even with the metal plate.

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As such, I resorted to one of my most hated machines: the laser cutter. Using the files outputted by Swillkb, I was able to instantly cut out the pieces. I made the mid-layers out of cherry and the bottom layer out of acrylic. I did experience some issues with the holes being a bit off center on the acrylic layer (due to warping from the heat, I presume), but it is not noticeable. The wood was scorched by the laser cutter. Doing this again, I would cut it slightly large, then sand it to size.

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As such, the back is transparent, showing off the internal components, just like the exhibition back of a watch.

Finished Product

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It has its flaws: I never added a USB port to allow the cable to be detached, the soldering is a bit shoddy, and the case is scorched. It’s been a journey though and has taught me many good lessons to help me make a second, third, and many more custom boards.

Please leave a comment or send me an email if you have any questions.

Chris Reeve Giraffe Bone Mnandi

Introduction

The Chris Reeve Giraffe Bone Mnandi is what I would consider to be my grail knife. It isn’t too big, nor is it too small. It has some of the highest tolerances and best craftsmanship one can find in any production knife.

This will not be a review. I do not plan on using this knife and will only carry it on certain occasions. For the most part, it will be relegated to fondling at home and a special spot on my shelf.

Specs

Date of Manufacture: October 22, 2003
Blade Material: CPM S30V at 58-59 RC
Blade Length: 2.75″
Handle Material: 6Al4V Titanium
Overall Length: 6.375″
MSRP: $400

Video

Coming soon.

Packaging and Paperwork

Luckily for me, the knife came with all of its original packaging and documentation.

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The box is interesting, as it is the older rectangular style. Since the knife was made in 2003, it only has the stickers for winning the 2000, 2001, and 2003 Manufacturing Quality Award.

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The right end of the box has stickers labeling the contents.

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Inside, there is a small sheet containing information about this specific limited edition.

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There is also the original birth card, which is often lost over the years. It is completely handwritten, in comparison to newer cards, which only have handwritten dates and Chris Reeve’s signature.

Included Items

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There is an Allen wrench that comes with each knife. I believe they were all taped to the lid of the box, as shown. They are 5/64″, which fit the screws on the knife.

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Additionally, there is a small calf skin pouch. The are still manufactured, although I have heard that there are quality and design differences between the old and new versions. It is quite interesting that this pouch is completely new, as it doesn’t show any sign of stretching at all.

Newer Mnandis come with a microfiber cloth and fluorinated grease. This one had neither.

Design

The Mnandi features the Chris Reeve Integral Lock design. In essence, it is a one piece framelock. The slabs of giraffe bone are not scales or overlays, but are, in fact, inlaid into the titanium scales. The titanium is slightly milled to precisely fit the giraffe bone. They are attached using 3M VHB (Very High Bond) tape.

The Mnandi has 13 different parts different parts.

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1. Front Scale
2. Blade
3. Back (lockbar side) Scale
4. Pivot
5. Smaller (rear) washer
6. Spacer
7. Larger (front) washer
8. Bushing
9. Long screw
10. Body pin (product page)
11. Back spacer (product page)
12. Clip (product page)
13. Short screw (product page)
14. Allen wrench

I will be doing a write-up as well as a video tutorial on how to disassemble and lubricate a Mnandi. It will be linked here after it is complete.

Fit and Finish

Tolerances are great. There is no blade play (side-to-side, up/down, back/front) at all. The blade centering is perfect both closed and opened. The lockup is good at around 50%. The lockbar itself is still, although not overly so. I never worry about the knife closing on itself.

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Left: Lockbar deploys at around 50%. Right: Blade centering is near perfect.

The hollow grind is symmetric and incredibly thin.

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Top: Lubricant residue shows the path of the detent ball. Bottom: The “S” signifies S30V steel.
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Lockbar side

Functionality

As I mentioned in the introduction, I do not plan on using this knife. Chris Reeve Knives does not offer re-blades for pre-2011 knives, preventing me from acquiring an extra blade to use. Furthermore, as Tim Reeve, son of Chris Reeve, pointed out, using the knife would eventually show wear on the handle, which would reduce collector’s value over time.

However, I still do find occasions to bring the knife out. The clip looks very innocent and fashionable when clipped on a shirt pocket. It is a nice accessory to have and an easy way to conceal a knife in situations where it something larger, like a Sebenza, might not be appropriate.

Value

Precises of this piece have varied wildly through the years. The original MSRP was $400, which was a small premium over the a regular Mnandi. Prices did not appear to increase until recently, when fewer and fewer have been surfacing on the market.

Previous Sales:

October 2003: $400 on Knifeart (Link)
January 2006: Unknown on British Blades (Link)
June 2008: $445 on Bladeforums (Link)
May 2010: $325 on Bladeforums (Link)
December 2016: $1750 on Bladeforums (Link)

 

 

Mike Draper Mini Titanium Spatula Review

Introduction

A key tool in food preparation is a good spatula. They can be used to flip burgers on the grill or to make the perfect egg. Mike Draper gave his spatula high end treatment with the use of titanium. Coming in both standard and mini sizes, the shiny titanium is definitely a show stopper. However, is the titanium just a gimmick or is there value to its usage?

This product was provided by EatingTools for review.

Specs

Maker: Mike Draper
Materials: 6AL4V Titanium, stainless steel screws
Dimensions: 2.125″ x 2.875 x 7.875″, 0.22″ thick
Weight: 1.5 oz
Price: $32.50 from eatingtools.com

Design

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Mike Draper has two sizes of spatulas available: A larger “standard” spatula and a mini spatula. The basic shape of the two are the same, but there are also some differences. The larger version has both an angled and a flat blade style.

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Picture from eatingtools.com

Additionally, the larger version uses four screws instead of only three on the mini version. The butt of the handle has two different designs. One version is curved, matching the curves of the drilled holes. The other version has a slightly pointed end.

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On both versions of the spatula, there are two main parts consisting of two pieces of titanium, a handle and a blade. The blade has a single bend in it, giving it rise up to the area that connects to the handle.

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The handle also has a bend, which corresponds with the bend in the blade. There is a hole drilled at the end of the handle for a wrist thong or for hanging up.

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Fit and Finish

When it comes to any handmade product, fit and finish is a defining feature of its quality.

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The fit and finish on the spatula is great. The spatula has a brushed finish that resists scratches and wear well. However, it is a finger print magnet. Thankfully, a wipe with a cloth will remove the oils left from your hand.

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One area that was a tad imperfect was the screws. I believe that the screws were longer and had to be cut down to size in order to be flush with the handle. Somewhere during the progress, it appears that an actual piece was trimmed off. The brushed finish, however, looks great on the screws.

Functionality

To test the spatula, I put it to work making eggs every morning. Even with its small size, flipping eggs is a breeze on my cast iron. With all metal spatulas, I would not recommend using this on a non-stick pan.

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The titanium is very flexible, though it retains its shape very well. This makes getting under eggs very easy. The handle, although un-insulated, does not get hot.

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Food particles can easily get stuck on the surface, but a bit of scrubbing and elbow grease makes it look like new again.

With its small size, the spatula easily fits in a backpack for camping trips. I took it out into the woods with my cast iron for a nice cookout. I definitely recommend titanium tools and utensils after this experience. Between my American Kami SporkTiStix, and Spatula, I was never worried that my tools were going to give out. The spatula, even with its thinness, did not suffer any deformation on the trek and returned just the way it left.

Conclusion

A spatula might seem like something you’d pick up at the dollar store, but the this titanium spatula really shows you how great a cooking tool can be. Its durability is second to known and its design really showcases craftsmanship at its best.

Alan Folts TiStix Review

Introduction

Titanium is all the craze nowadays. With food utensils, they provide a distinct advantage over steel, with properties such as anti-corrosion and weight being among the most notable. However, Titanium tools are often much more expensive as they are harder to work with. When it comes to something as simple as chopsticks, does the added cost still make them worth it to buy?

This product was provided by EatingTools for review.

Specs

Manufacturer: Alan Folts
Place of Manufacture: USA
Length: 9.375″
Weight: 1.7oz
Price: $75 (link to purchase: here)

Packaging

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The TiStix come in a nice black sleeve packaging. There is a small loop that slips over the flap to keep it closed. Over the left side has the logo printed on faintly.

When it comes to packaging, the TiStix really hit the ball out of the park. I can see myself reusing this packaging for months if I continue to be careful about drying them off before putting them back.

Design

The TiStix are cut and milled at a small machine shop in South Carolina. After that, the TiStix are finished by hand by Alan Folts. This includes the anodizing, polishing, and bead blasting.

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Starting at the tip, the front inch are bead blasted. This gives them some more grip and contrasts with the rest of the polished body.

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Moving to the middle, there is some milling that add to the aesthetic. The largest milled ring are bead blasted for higher contrast. The other milled rings are not finished differently from the body.

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The end is bead blasted and is steeply tapered into a dulled tip. There is more milling here and, like before, only the largest ring is bead blasted.

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Other models come with different color anodizations that add some customizability.

Fit and Finish

The fit and finish on the TiStix are impeccable. It is impossible to tell the individual sticks apart from their size. This is expected, as they were professionally machined. The milled rings are distanced the same on both and the depths are the same.

When it comes to finish, even though the TiStix are finished by hand, they look perfect. The polished surfaces look smooth. They look a bit tumbled, which would explain their ability to resist wear marks. They frankly look like pieces of art rather than eating utensils.

Functionality

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I was a bit dubious at first about any differences the TiStix would have over other chopsticks. I was, however, pleasantly surprised by the weight increase. It might seem like a hindrance, but the added weight shifts the center of balance closer to the hand. As such, they are much easier to control. Further, the titanium has a slightly “grippier” feel in comparison to stainless steel. While not as textured as something like bamboo or wood, the TiStix makes up it by being much heftier.

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The sandblasted tips make it easy to pick up the most slippery of items. This contrasts greatly with other types of chopsticks that either do not have any type of feature to help with gripping, or those that simply have a few grooves cut into the tip.

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When it comes to cleaning, the titanium holds up very well to scrubbing and does not stain. Using a sponge and some dish soap, it took no time at all to remove hardened food gunk off of them. The milled titanium rings are not deep enough to make cleaning them difficult. The bead blasted contrast remains after cleaning.

Value and Competition

At $75, the TiStix do not come cheap. However, the price can be justified. In comparison to other titanium chopsticks, the TiStix’s design, with its milling and bead blasting, showcase a higher level of workmanship. The ergonomics are also better, with the strong tapering putting the center of mass higher up than with other chopsticks.

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When considering value, one should look at both the item itself and how it compares. While the TiStix may look simple, they handily beat out the competition through it’s design and attention to detail. These additional design aspects require more workmanship, which further rationalize its price. For those reasons, I feel like the TiStix are reasonably priced and present tangible advantages to its competitors.

Conclusion

I was a bit surprised by the TiStix. As someone who has used chopsticks for many, many years, the TiStix may be the best pair of chopsticks that I have ever used. This is not an exaggeration. The higher center of mass and bead blasted tips make grabbing food a breeze. With their hardy solid, one piece construction, I have no fear of bringing them out and using them in lieu of disposable utensils. Given the opportunity, I would definitely purchase many more pairs for household use.

Cergol Tool & Forgeworks Hatchet Review

Introduction

As one of my first endeavors into bowl and spoon making, I decided to purchase a nice hatchet. A hatchet would both suffice as a carving tool, but also as an outdoorsman’s tool. Further, it well made hatchet should last me for the rest of my life with good maintenance and careful use.

I learned about Aaron Cergol while researching hammers, but soon found his axe-work to be quite impressive. Communication with Mr. Cergol was easy and 16 weeks later, I had a hatchet in my hand. Let’s take a look at it.

Specs

Maker: Aaron Cergol
Materials: 5160 Steel and American Hickory
Weight: 2 Pounds
Length: 14 Inches
Place of Manufacture: Milwaukee, WI
Price: Varies

Packaging

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The hatchet was shipped USPS priority, insured of course. The box was branded with a small “Cergol Tool & Forgeworks” stamp above my address.

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Inside the box was an excess of packing material. This is a good thing. When I first saw the package and shook it around (as always), I heard no rattling.

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The hatchet itself was well wrapped in the red paper and did not suffer any damage during transit.

Ordering and Design

Cergol Tool & Forgeworks usually has a few items in stock on their website (here). They will have occasional sales that are posted on Instagram (here).

However, when I wanted to order a hatchet, I did not find a model on Aaron’s website that I wanted. Instead, there were a few examples on his Instagram that I liked. So, I sent him an email. Aaron was very helpful in the ordering process. He explained all the choices that I had, giving both pros and cons for each choice. He was never pushy and always responded quickly to emails.

My particular hatchet is made from 5160 steel. Aaron explained that 4140 would be tougher and would be better for a general purpose hatchet, but since I wanted something that could be used for carving, the finer edge that 5160 could take would be better. As for the handle, he makes them out of American Hickory. I was given the choice of an oval or octagonal handle. I chose an octagonal handle as it is a bit smaller and is supposed to be easier to hold.

If you’d like to order a tool from Cergol Tool & Forgeworks and don’t see what you want on the website, I’d highly recommend contacting Aaron Cergol directly. You can email him at: cergolforge@hotmail.com.

Fit and Finish

The hatchet comes in a nice leather sheath that is secured with rivets. It is not the most secure, and the hatchet can shift around in the sheath, but it cannot be wiggled out in any way.

The hatchet is held in by a snap enclosure affixed on a leather strap that goes over the open top. The snap is firm and secure, though the long strap makes undoing the snap a breeze. There is no belt loop on the sheath.

The inside of the sheath does is raw leather. One can see the trace marks that were drawn in for the sheath. On one side, there is a deep cut into the leather. I am not sure what these are from, although I don’t believe this detracts from its function.

The hatchet has a nice satin finish to it. I preferred this look over a blackened look and had asked for the hatchet to be made this way.

The handle is 12 inches long from the end knob to the shoulder and is fitted securely.

There is a bit of space near the poll of the hatchet, although the handle is much to wide to ever wiggle into that area.

The maker’s mark is a simple “CERGOL” near the poll. It is not obtrusive and, in my opinion, adds to the hatchet rather than takes away from it. It would appear as though the “L” was partially cut off either from the initial strike or from polishing.

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There are file marks along the hatchet head adding to the “working finish”. They are deeper in some areas than others, but, overall, do not stand out.

Functionality

I couldn’t wait to take this guy out and give it a good swing, so I headed into my suburban neighborhood backyard and took it upon myself to destroy a 4×4. The weight of the head is well suited for one handed swinging and I found the hatchet doing much of the work.

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When I  split the 4×4, the hatchet impacted a small pebble in the ground, giving the edge its first battle scar. The cutting edge folded a little. It was an easy fix though, with my Opinel Sharpening Stone (review).

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I choked up on the handle and worked at getting a few controlled cuts along the edge. I was happy to have chosen an octagonal handle as the handle was just right for my hand. Any bigger and it would have been harder to control the cuts.

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I’ll do add onto this review after I get some more time to use the hatchet.

Conclusion

Buying this hatchet has been a very personal experience for me. I was able to give input from the very beginning and, after receiving the hatchet, feel like “this is mine”. I have no doubt that the hatchet will service me very well in the years to come and will definitely be going back to Aaron Cergol for other hand-forged tools.

Snow Peak Titanium Spork

Introduction

The word “spork” sounds so dorky. It’s a portmanteau of the word “spoon” and “fork”. There are many designs on the market, but with something so funky, it can be hard to make sure it stays useful. The Snow Peak Titanium Spork is made of premium materials, but still keeps the cost fairly low. This piece of gear has made it into my backpack everyday. Here’s my take on this spork.

Specs

Place of Manufacture: Japan
Weight: 16g
Dimensions: 40mm (width), 165mm (length)

Packaging

The spork comes in simple plastic packing sealed at the top with a piece of cardboard with two staples. The packaging is nothing fancy, though it is well suited for something of this price range. The tips of the fork prongs deformed the plastic a bit.

Design

When I first got the spork, I was surprised by the size of the spoon part. I believe they designed the bowl of the spoon to be extra wide because the tips of the fork reduce the volume that it can hold.

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The tips themselves are not too long, for if they were any longer, the bowl would be able to hold even less liquid. The fork prongs are wide and far apart. They are well blunted and have no sharp edges.

The handle is engraved on both sides. On the front, there is the “snow peak” logo and name. On the back, there is “TITANIUM JAPAN”. The back is engraved much shallower than the front. Additionally, the font on the back is much thinner and is of a sans sherif font, though the front has a sherif font.

Fit and Finish

This particular model has a plain titanium finish. They also come in different anodized colors, such as blue, green and pink. Upon receipt of the spork, I immediately noticed scuffs along the body of the spork. While they do not impact the usability of the spork, they can be an eyesore at the right angle.

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Furthermore, along some of the edges I noticed some inconsistencies. THese were mainly found along the main bend into the bowl of the spoon. Nonetheless, at this price point, these problems can easily be overlooked.

Functionality

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The spork is very easy to use. The handle is of a decent size and the spoon is able to hold lots of food at once. The weight can be a little hard to get used to as it is very light in comparison to a steel utensil.

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Cleaning titanium can be very annoying. The surface texture makes dried food hard to remove and it feels odd to scrub at it. However, with enough elbow grease, the spork was looking back to new after a good cleaning.

Conclusion

As something I would keep in my backpack everyday, the Snow Peak Titanium Spork is an excellent product. It’s best feature is its price point, followed by the large spoon and its use of titanium. If anything, its weaknesses lie in its overall quality and the difficulty to clean it. However, they can easily be looked over because of its price. I don’t think I’d buy a second while this one is still all good, but if I ever lose this one, I’ll be logging into Amazon to get one to my door immediately.

Zach Wood Pry Bar Review

Introduction

 

I saw a Zach Wood tool on r/EDC and loved it. His website was a bit sparse and his Facebook page was rarely updated. There was a stickied post, though, that directed me to joining a Facebook group that I’ve grown to love. There, I managed to purchase my first Zach Wood tool. I’ve been carrying it ever since and I’m sure I’ll be carrying it for a very long time.

Specs

Maker: Zach Wood Custom Knives and Tools
Place of Manufacture: USA
Length: 6 inches
Material: A2
Price: $185 (retail)

The Maker

Zach Wood is a custom maker based in Montana. Beyond the type of tools mentioned in the review, he also makes knives through forging and stock removal. He’s quite active in the eponymous Facebook group.

Purchasing

I purchased the tool second hand on the Facebook group. This is the easiest way to acquire a tool. They occasionally show up on eBay, forums and from a few online sellers, but they come at a premium and they often don’t have them in stock.

The second easiest way to purchase a tool is to get it through one of the “buy” posts that Zach makes. Since there are so many people who want to purchase a tool, Zach will often sell them to the first “x” commenters or pick a few randomly from the commenters in a lottery form.

It appears as though most secondary sellers in the group are honest and I have read of no issues. For me, my item originated in Thailand, but the seller was excellent and I received my tool well packaged with a bead as a gift.

Fit and Finish

I would describe the tool as well made, but still has the touches of being handmade.

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The “A2” stamped into the front pry is noticeably uneven and the “A” looks as though the punch moved while being hit. It makes no functional difference and, in my opinion, makes pry tool easily recognizable and unique.

The grinds on the chisel end still feature the grind lines. The tip is not sharp and all the edges are rounded.

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The clip is thick and is very stiff. I have rolled around with the pry bar clipped to my jeans and it never shifted. There is a double side to it, though. The pry bar can be a bit hard to get clipped to a pocket and it appears as though it is starting to create a wear pattern on my jeans.

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The design of the clip is very interesting. There is a small hole, that goes all the way through the bar, where the clip sticks in. This keeps the clip from rotating. The clip itself is held in place via a bicycle chain link. These can be easily removed and replaced with a chain link of a different color.

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The side edges of the tool are rounded, but are straight. The tool was purchased second hand, so I am unsure if all of the wear marks are from the maker, but from the pictures from the maker, it would seems as though he purposely wears the tool during finishing.

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The fuller along the front of the knife is straight although the holes are not perfectly aligned. However, the holes that hold a screw bit and the O2 tank opener seem accurately sized.

Functionality

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While many purchase these tools for collecting, I purchased it for using. With a length of 6 inches, the tool might not fit that well in some pants. It does all right in my jeans though.

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As a pry tool, I have used the tool to remove adhesive that the last tenant had left on my door. Furthermore, I have used the bit holder to help disassemble open up a gas tank. The length allows for more torque to be applied in comparison to a normal screw driver.

Conclusion

While many might scoff at the idea of “EDC” and think one piece tools have little use, but I love this Zach Wood tool and have found uses for it most days. Having a pry tool is nice as it saves other tools, such as screwdrivers and knives, from being used improperly and damaged. I’ll be carrying this guy around for a while for sure.